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SICK vandals scrawl Islamic slogans on walls of Christian chapel in VILE attack

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Police in the German town of Brühl in the Rhein-Neckar district of Baden-Württemberg released a statement claiming the vandals had left the parish centre a “picture of devastation”.

The Christian centre was broken into on December 30 and police are now investigating the incident.

Details of the defacement come amid a spate of attacks on Christian sites in Germany and Austria over the New Year period.

In northern Austria, statues were beheaded and prayer books were burned when vandals broke into a chapel in the village of St Radegund on New Year’s Eve.

Religious iconography

During the same day in the nearby town of Auerbach, vandals also broke into a site, where they smashed the glass casing around two Virgin Mary statues and stole 22 murals, which they then burned in a local wood.

And just a few miles away, attackers broke into a chapel where they stole a Christ figure and beheaded a statue of St Barbara, in a sickening incident which caused 5,000 euros of damage.

The culprits are still at large and while police continue to investigate the incidents, they believe the attacks may have been religiously or culturally motivated.

The chapels are located within the Austrian region of Innviertel, which has witnessed an influx of migrants over the past year.

A report by the Austian Freedom Party published in September last year claimed 120,000 illegal migrants had entered Austria last year, despite the country only permitting 37,500 migrants per year.

Germany, which has also experienced record levels of immigration, was hit with another vile attack on a religious centre in November, when religious statues on display in public places in the town of Dülmen were defaced.

Vandals but off noses and fingers were cut off the forms of religious figures and in some cases, statues were even beheaded.

Günther Fehmer, who oversees Dülmen’s finances, said members of the town’s Catholic community were deeply saddened by the vandalism, which he estimates would cost a six figure sum to rectify.

He said:  “We’re all very concerned by what is happening, and we’re also angry.”

Mr Fehmer added that it was impossible to prevent the destruction.

He said: “You can’t take these sculptures inside in the evening and you can’t watch them all night. And a video camera in public spaces is also problematic.”