Home News Charity ‘chuggers’ to be named and shamed over harassment of elderly donators

Charity ‘chuggers’ to be named and shamed over harassment of elderly donators

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UK Charities who harass elderly shoppers are set to be “named and shamed” by a tougher new regulator launched this week.

In an attempt to restore public faith in charity sector fundraisers using pushy tactics will be made accountable for putting people under unfair pressure in the street.

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The new and independent Fundraising Regulator will have the power to publicly name charities which do not abide by the code of practice and to make “cease and desist” orders.

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It will receive part-funding from 45 of the largest charities in the country to help stamp out bad behaviour after outcry over the actions of over-zealous staff.

Any charities reprimanded could also be forced to fade the regulator before vein allowed to go ahead with new campaigns.

Registration with the regulator will be on a voluntary basis, but should that approach fail statutory regulation could be introduced.

However, the watchdog will have powers to investigate charities whether or not they have membership.

Mike Adamson, British Red Cross CEO is one of many who believes faith must be restored in fundraising.

He said: “This is an essential step to help rebuild trust and balance our responsibilities effectively between the people we support through our work, and our donors and potential donors.”

So many complaints have been made in recent years over forceful tactiss some charity employees have been branded chuggers -or charity muggers.

Last year, a government review of how the sector is regulated was ordered by the Cabinet Office after the death of 92-year-old Olive Cooke, a lifelong charitable donor, who had been overwhelmed by fundraising requests from charities.

Revelations about the tactics of private agencies acting on behalf of charities followed her death, including the trading of private information and persistent calls to people who had requested they were left alone.

Sir Stuart Etherington, the chief executive of the National Council for Voluntary Organisations, recommended the introduction of a tougher regulator.

And his findings were supported.

A damning report from MPs at the start of the year said charities which allowed fundraisers to put pressure on vulnerable elderly people to donate and sold people’s personal data were either “incompetent or willingly blind”.

In the past there was a system of self-regulation split between the Fundraising Standards Board, the Institute of Fundraising and the Public Fundraising Association.

British Red Cross CEO Mike Adamson said: “This is an essential step to help rebuild trust and balance our responsibilities effectively between the people we support through our work, and our donors and potential donors.”

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